Vinyl records are still produced all over the world. Even though the number of press shops is small today, some manufacturers, especially from Japan, have an excellent reputation among collectors. Japanese vinyl producers release their records in limited editions, which are the most expensive in Europe. Music fans love vinyls from Japan, because of several unique features, which are almost unique to Japanese producers.

Vinyls

Vinyls

High-Quality Standards in All Areas

However, vinyls from Japan do not exclusively contain music of Japanese artists. Western artists also turn to Japan to release their vinyls, although Japanese companies produce those records in limited numbers and sell them at a fixed price. To ensure that the records meet high-quality standards, the manufacturers use advanced pressing machines. At the same time, they are always looking to improve their vinyls and use unique material recipes. On top of that, detailed quality management throughout the entire manufacturing process ensures that only excellent records leave factories. However, Japanese companies go one step further.

Limited Amounts

For serious audiophiles, old records also get new remasters. Japanese manufacturers use those vinyls create high-quality press dies and such masters mostly appear in a minimal number. Accordingly, they are in great demand among collectors. The care that Japanese producers show for their product is also evident in the packaging, which is mostly more extensive than what you are used to seeing from European or American vendors. Buyers will find posters, lyric sheets, and elaborate inner sleeves included with the record. The covers are also made of higher quality and thicker material. However, people think that the relatively high humidity in Japan is the reason for better-insulated casing. Finally, the companies provide the records with a paper band or a so-called obi, which is a Japanese word for belt. Collectors attach particular importance to this feature as it identifies a genuine Japanese product.

Old records

Old records

The Crackling Is Completely Absent

The thorough care and top-notch production also affect the sound. People consider Japanese vinyls to be dead silent because the distinctive crackling noise is absent here. The smooth sound might also be attributed to the small number of units. The fewer panels a die has to press, the higher the quality of the products. You can also hear no crackling because of a new type of PVC, which delivers that impeccable sound quality. Toshiba Musical Industries was especially known for the use of this material, which, sadly, is no longer in use today in current presses.

The sound of newly mastered records also shows a change in our listening habits. Newer records emphasize higher tones while the lows are not so strongly accentuated. The producers tailor the sound to these living conditions in Japan, where population density is rather high. Collectors appreciate these high-quality vinyls and often set out on a search for records that meet their expectations on the Internet.